Data User Guide - Text descriptions

Figure 1: The dual cohort cross-sequential design of LSAC

Figure 1 shows the years corresponding to each wave, along with the ages of participants at each wave of the B and K cohorts.

Dual cohort cross-sequential design of LSAC.
Cohort Wave  Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 Wave 5 Wave 6 Wave 7 Wave 8 Wave 9C
9C1 9C2
Year 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 2020 2021
Infant (B) 0–1 years 2–3 years 4–5 years 6–7 years  8–9 years  10–11 years  12–13 years 14–15 years 16–17 years 17–18 years
Child (K) 4–5 years 6–7 years 8–9 years 10–11 years 12–13 years 14–15 years 16–17 years 18–19 years 20–21 years 21–22 years

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Figure 2: Marked-up questionnaires

Figure 2 shows examples of marked-up questionnaires from LSAC. The variable name is added next to each question, e.g. ‘bre06a’ or ‘bre05a’.

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Figure 3: Wave 2 interview specification

Figure 3 shows an example of labelled questionnaires, which have been generated for the instruments used in Wave 2 of the study onwards.

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Figure 4: Example of filtering in Excel

Figure 4 shows an example of filtering in the Excel data dictionary.

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Figure 5: Month of interview for B cohort study families in Wave 1 to 9C1

Figure 5 shows the number of interviews completed according to the number of months since the beginning of fieldwork, for each wave of the B cohort. The number of interviews completed fluctuates, with differences between waves. However, most interviews are generally completed around four to five months since the start of fieldwork. For Wave 9C1, which had a shorter fieldwork period, most interviews were completed one month since the beginning of fieldwork.

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Figure 6: Month of interview for K cohort study families in Wave 1 to 9C1

Figure 6 shows the number of interviews completed according to the number of months since the beginning of fieldwork, for each wave of the K cohort. The number of interviews completed fluctuates, with differences between waves. However, most interviews are generally completed around four to five months since the start of fieldwork. For Wave 9C1, which had a shorter fieldwork period, most interviews were completed one month since the beginning of fieldwork.

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Figure 7: Age distribution of B cohort sample at each wave

Figure 7 shows the age distribution of the B cohort sample for each wave of LSAC. The figures show the age of the study child as a base figure (i.e. 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 years) plus a number of months. For example, a B cohort study child aged three years and one month at time of interview in Wave 2 is shown against ‘13’ on the x-axis. The age distribution of the B cohort sample fluctuates, with differences between waves. However, in all waves, the highest percentage of the sample is around six to 12 months above the base age.

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Figure 8: Age distribution of K cohort sample at each wave

Figure 8 shows the age distribution of the B cohort sample for each wave of LSAC. The figures show the age of the study child as a base figure (i.e. 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20 years) plus a number of months. For example, a K cohort study child aged five years and one month at time of interview in Wave 2 is shown against ‘13’ on the x-axis. The age distribution of the K cohort sample fluctuates, with differences between waves. However, in all waves, the highest percentage of the sample is around six to 14 months above the base age. 

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Figure 9: Distribution of time between interviews, B cohort, Wave 1 to 9C1

Figure 9 shows the distribution of the number of months between interviews in subsequent waves for the B Cohort. The distribution is approximately normal or bell-shaped for all waves. There is most commonly around 19 and 32 months between interviews in subsequent waves. For example, there is around 25 months between interviews in Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the B cohort.

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Figure 10: Distribution of time between interviews, K cohort, Wave 1 to 9C1

Figure 10 shows the distribution of the number of months between interviews in subsequent waves for the K Cohort. The distribution is approximately normal or bell-shaped for all waves. There is most commonly around 21 and 30 months between interviews in subsequent waves. For example, there is around 25 months between interviews in Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the K cohort.

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Figure 11: Cohort benchmarks by state, part of state and gender

Figure 11 shows the population percentages in each state by the part of the state (metropolitan and non-metropolitan) and by gender stratum for both the B and K cohorts. Figures for the B and K cohorts generally match closely. However, the population from which the K cohort was selected was slightly more likely to live in capital cities.

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Figure 12: Proportion of mothers who completed Year 12, cohort benchmarks by state and part of state

Figure 12 shows the population percentages of mothers who completed Year 12 by state and part of state (metropolitan and non-metropolitan) for the B and K cohorts. In all parts of the country, the B cohort had a higher proportion of mothers who completed Year 12 than the K cohort.

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Figure 13: Proportion of mothers who speak a language other than English at home, cohort benchmarks by state and part of state

Figure 13 shows the population percentages of mothers who speak a language other than English in the home by state and part of state (metropolitan and non-metropolitan) for the B and K cohorts. Percentages were similar between the B and K cohorts.

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Figure 14: Tempogram of children watching TV, video, DVD or movie while eating or drinking by wave and cohort.

Figure 14 shows the times at which children from Wave 1 of the K cohort and Wave 2 of the B and K cohorts watched TV, videos, DVDs or movies while eating or drinking. For both waves and cohorts, these activities were most commonly done in the mornings and evenings. Additionally, they were more common in older children.

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